Travel by Edna St. Vincent Millay

Edna St. Vincent Millay
February 22, 1892 – October 19, 1950

TrainTrackScene

TRAVEL

The railroad track is miles away,
And the day is loud with voices speaking,
Yet there isn’t a train goes by all day
But I hear its whistle shrieking.

All night there isn’t a train goes by,
Though the night is still for sleep and dreaming
But I see its cinders red on the sky,
And hear its engine steaming.

My heart is warm with the friends I make,
And better friends I’ll not be knowing,
Yet there isn’t a train I wouldn’t take,
No matter where it’s going.

TrainDistance

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Travel is included in Second April.

SWYK! (Share What You Know) – Free eBooks

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SWYK! (Share What You Know) is a weekly meme hosted by MizB of Should Be Reading. This meme asks you to share 3 tips on one of the topics below, OR 3 tips on a different topic that you know well and feel others would benefit from!

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One of the topics this week is Where to find eBooks online. I’ll be mentioning sites for free eBooks, most of which are in public domain. What a boon for lovers of classic literature.

The first place I always check is Project Gutenberg. I even use their recent additions page as my home page. The main link is for the United States site. If you are in another country, you can check here for further information. Project Gutenberg books are no longer limited to plain text, but are available in a variety of formats to fit any reader or mobile device.

The Online Books Page headed by John Mark Ockerbloom is a resource I check frequently. Mary Mark Ockerbloom brings us A Celebration of Women Writers.

A third option is ManyBooks.

There are too many more to list, but this highlights the largest and user-friendly ones I’ve found.

CharlieBrownRead

Why stop here? As an added bonus, AUDIO BOOKS are available. If you enjoy listening to books, don’t miss exploring LibriVox.

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What are your favorite sites for free eBooks? Do you have any other sites to share with us?

The Illustrated Omar Khayyam-Quatrain #38 The Last Dream To Plumb

Another treat from Benny’s The Illustrated Omar Khayyam. I love most of Benny’s illustrations, but some grab my attention more than others. I found this one especially striking. Details about Benny’s new translation.

Bennythomas's Weblog

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I repent the dream I lost in Time’s womb;

Perchance Life hides from me a dream to plumb:

Not satiated with the dream to come

Nor what on my skull in cipher writ: Tomb.

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For a Monument at Silbury-Hill by Robert Southey

Silbury Hill

It is National Poetry Day in the UK and Ireland. I just found out that each year is themed. The theme for 2014 is Remember.

RobertSouthey

For a Monument at Silbury-Hill by Robert Southey

This mound in some remote and dateless day
Rear’d o’er a Chieftain of the Age of Hills,
May here detain thee Traveller! from thy road
Not idly lingering. In his narrow house
Some Warrior sleeps below: his gallant deeds
Haply at many a solemn festival
The Bard has harp’d, but perish’d is the song
Of praise, as o’er these bleak and barren downs
The wind that passes and is heard no more.
Go Traveller on thy way, and contemplate
Glory’s brief pageant, and remember then
That one good deed was never wrought in vain.

The Illustrated Omar Khayyam as ebook

Those of you who follow Benny’s blog and his Rubaiyat blog know that he has been working on a new translation of the Rubaiyat. It is now complete and includes fifty water-color illustrations by Benny.

BennyOmarKBennyPB

What is the secret of the astounding success of Omar Khayyam? Was it because he made a philosophy of wine, advocating, ‘Eat, drink and be merry’? Or was it mystic wine?

Bennythomas's Weblog

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This colour plate does not find place in the book.)

For those who are interested in Omar Khayyam my version shall certainly resonate as true to the original. Imagine the pleasure of reading him for the first time? Eight hundred years later you can relive the pleasure his quatrains first produced among his readers.

“In the ten sections of his book, Benny Thomas has composed his own Khayyāmasque quatrains covering most of the central and salient features of Khayyāmian themes. Whether it is in the chapter titled “Cup of Wine” or “Love Feast,” the essence of Omar Khayyām’s Rubā‘iyyāt is echoed in the poems of Benny Thomas. For those interested in a mystical reading of Khayyām’s quatrains, this collection of poems provides an invaluable insight…” (Selected from the Foreword by Prof. Mehdi Aminrazavi the author of The Wine of Wisdom.)

http://www.lulu.com/shop/benny-thomas/the-illustrated-omar-khayyam/ebook/product-21799421.html

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He Died in Paris After All

Thanks to Jim for bringing this poet to my attention.

tarnmoor

Peruvian Poet César VallejoPeruvian Poet César Vallejo

Since I’ve been reading so much about Peru, I felt bad that I had not read any Peruvian poetry. According to what I’ve read, the national poet of that land was César Vallejo (1892-1938). I took a fancy to the following poem, which I present in both English and Spanish:

Black Stone on Top of a White Stone

I shall die in Paris, in a rainstorm,
On a day I already remember.
I shall die in Paris—it does not bother me—
Doubtless on a Thursday, like today, in autumn.

It shall be a Thursday, because today, Thursday
As I put down these lines, I have set my shoulders
To the evil. Never like today have I turned,
And headed my whole journey to the ways where I am alone.

César Vallejo is dead. They struck him,
All of them, though he did nothing to them,
They…

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Valentine’s Day 2014

Happy Valentine’s Day!

ValentineRed

Which General Hospital couples will make it through 2014 and which will crash and burn?

 

Moon Rondeau
By Carl Sandburg

“Love is a door we shall open together.”
So they told each other under the moon
One evening when the smell of leaf mould
And the beginnings of roses and potatoes
Came on a wind.

Late in the hours of that evening
They looked long at the moon and called it
A silver button, a copper coin, a bronze wafer,
A plaque of gold, a vanished diadem,
A brass hat dripping from deep waters.

“People like us,
us two,
We own the moon.”

 

Revisit a favorite from the Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam on Benny’s blog.

Happiness by Carl Sandburg

the-picnic

 

Happiness by Carl Sandburg

I asked professors who teach the meaning of life to tell me what is happiness.
And I went to famous executives who boss the work of thousands of men.
They all shook their heads and gave me a smile as though I was trying to fool with them.
And then one Sunday afternoon I wandered out along the Desplaines river
And I saw a crowd of Hungarians under the trees with their women and children and a keg of beer and an accordion.