50 Years at Project Gutenberg

Hot off the Press

On July 4, 1971, Michael S. Hart, who had been given access to a mainframe computer at the University of Illinois, typed the United States Declaration of Independence into the machine and sent it off to about 100 users via ARPANET – the infant Internet. And so the first e-book was born, along with Hart’s vision of making literature “as free as the air we breathe”: Project Gutenberg. Half a century later, PG offers readers over 65,000 free e-books in the U.S. public domain, available in a wide variety of formats and languages.

In the first couple of decades, Michael typed in most of the books himself in his spare time. The 10th e-book, released in 1989, was the King James Bible. By 1994, there were 100 books at PG – the 100th e-book was The Complete Works of William Shakespeare. Just three years later came…

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Three Complete H. P. Lovecraft Poetry Readings by William E. Hart

Marvelous CD, a must for fans of H. P. Lovecraft and lovers of weird/horror poetry.

CthulhuWho1's Blog

The folks over at Fedogan & Bremer, and Composer Graham Plowman, have all approved my request to share the following three complete tracks from our “H. P. Lovecraft’s Fungi From Yuggoth and Other Poems” CD (published by Fedogan & Bremer (2016)), in a visual form on YouTube, so everyone can hear (and read) some full-length examples of what’s on the 48-track CD.

Just click on the title cards below, or the links below them, and you will get to hear some of my personal favorites; including “Nemesis,” which I believe will still be a favorite poem and reading for Lovecraftians, long after I am gone from this world.

All three of these poems, are given a power and majesty by Graham Plowman’s beautiful scores; as are all of the other 45 tracks on the CD too!

The Ancient Track by H. P. Lovecraft
Read by William…

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Our 18th Anniversary

ReadingHappiness

Congratulations and many thanks to all for the many books so lovingly provided.

Hot off the Press

18th anniversaryEighteen years ago, on October 1, 2000, Distributed Proofreaders volunteers began “preserving history one page at a time” by preparing public-domain e-books for Project Gutenberg. Since then, DP has contributed over 36,000 unique titles. Here’s a look back at some of DP’s accomplishments since our last retrospective.

Milestones

33,000 titles. In November 2016, Distributed Proofreaders posted its 33,000th unique title to Project Gutenberg, A Flower Wedding, by the great children’s book illustrator Walter Crane. You can read all about it in this celebratory post.

34,000 titles. Our 34,000th title was, appropriately, A Manual of the Art of Bookbinding, and was posted in July 2017. The DP blog post on this milestone is here.

35,000 titles. DP contributed its 35,000th title, Shores of the Polar Sea, in January 2018. This beautifully illustrated account of a 19th-Century expedition to the North Pole is celebrated in this…

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H.P. Lovecraft’s Fungi from Yuggoth and other Poems

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Are you a fan of Lovecraft’s stories but maybe not his poetry? I thought that was the case with me until listening to H.P. Lovecraft’s Fungi from Yuggoth and other Poems. Magnificently read by Will Hart with music by Graham Plowman, the experience was head and shoulders above merely reading the poems. I have already listened to most of the tracks more than once.

Visit CthulhuWho1’s Blog for more information and various links including a lengthy sample on YouTube.

H. P. Lovecraft’s Fungi From Yuggoth and Other Poems CD Promo on YouTube

Magnificent reading by Will!

CthulhuWho1's Blog

Posted on YouTube by Yours Truly, Will Hart

“A Teaser Sample file of snippets from all 48 tracks of Fedogan & Bremer’s CD of, “H. P. Lovecraft’s Fungi From Yuggoth and Other Poems” read by William E. Hart and scored by Graham Plowman; with Liner Notes by S. T. Joshi. These 21st-Century readings include all 36 Fungi from Yuggoth cosmic sonnets, plus a dozen more of H.P.L.’s grand poems, and a 12-page booklet!”

What a Great Christmas, Cthulhumas, Birthday, or Everyday Gift for Any Lovecraftian or Poetry Fan!

To purchase a copy, please visit Amazon at:

https://www.amazon.com/Lovecrafts-Fungi-Yuggoth-Other-Poems/dp/1878252801

or you can purchase a copy directly from Fedogan & Bremer at:

https://www.fedoganandbremer.com/products/h-p-lovecrafts-fungi-from-yuggoth-and-other-poems

Please help yourself to a printable pdf “Lyric” file of all of the words in the poems right here:

All the Words…

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Edgar Allan Poe

Edgar Allan Poe

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January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849

Poe was my God of Fiction. I used to love the horrible and the grotesque–much more than I do now–and can recall tales of murderers, spirits, reincarnations, metempsychoses, and every shudder-producing device known to literature!

H. P. Lovecraft

1922PoeCottage

Poe Cottage, Fordham, New York
Frank Belknap Long, H. P. Lovecraft and James F. Morton
April 11, 1922

H. P. Lovecraft also visited the Poe Cottage on September 23, 1924. This time with Samuel Loveman.

Today’s entry at the Interesting Literature blog is Five Fascinating Facts about Edgar Allan Poe. Other sites to visit include The Edgar Allan Poe Society of Baltimore and The Museum of Edgar Allan Poe in Richmond, Virginia.

Book Blog Name Tag

BBNameTag

Originating at the alwaysopinionatedgirl blog, I spotted it at Stefani’s Caught Read Handed blog and it looked like such fun, I just had to participate. All you have to do is list a character from a book for each letter in the name of your blog.

V – Vincent D’Agosta (Pendergast series by Douglas Preston & Lincoln Child)
A – Agatha Raisin (series by M.C. Beaton)
U – Ursule Mirouet (Ursule Mirouet by Honoré de Balzac)
Q – Quasimodo (The Hunchback of Notre-Dame by Victor Hugo)
U – Uriah Heep (David Copperfield by Charles Dickens)
E – Evan Evans (series by Rhys Bowen)
R – Richard Hannay (The Thirty-Nine Steps by John Buchan)

B – Benjamin January (series by Barbara Hambly)
O – Orabona (The Horror in the Museum by H.P. Lovecraft and Hazel Heald)
A – Anna Pigeon (series by Nevada Barr)
R – Robert Langdon (The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown)
D – Dagny Taggart (Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand)
I – Ilse Freemantle (Duma Key by Stephen King)
N – Nathaniel Peaslee (The Shadow out of Time by H.P. Lovecraft)
G – Gervaise Coupeau (L’Assommoir by Émile Zola)

H – Hamish Macbeth (series by M.C. Beaton)
O – Owen Orient (series by Frank Lauria)
U – Ursule Macquart (The Fortune of the Rougons by Émile Zola)
S – Stephanie Plum (series by Janet Evanovich)
E – Etienne Lantier (Germinal by Émile Zola)

I’m not tagging anyone, but play along if you have time!

Lovecraft, Long and Used Books

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In those days, Lovecraft and Long frequently browsed among the outside stalls of second-hand book shops. Sometimes Lovecraft thought of a friend in connection with some particular book which came to his hand, and if it cost no more than fifteen cents or a quarter, he would buy it for presentation purposes.
A Memoir of Lovecraft by Rheinhart Kleiner

 

Photo: Howard Phillips Lovecraft and Frank Belknap Long, Jr. in 1931.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fact and Fancy By H. P. Lovecraft

Happy Birthday to the old Gent!

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H.P. Lovecraft Mythos Book Club & Reading Group

How dull the wretch, whose philosophic mind
Disdains the pleasures of fantastic kind;
Whose prosy thoughts the joys of life exclude,
And wreck the solace of the poet’s mood!
Young Zeno, practic’d in the Stoic’s art,
Rejects the language of the glowing heart;
Dissolves sweet Nature to a mess of laws;
Condemns th’ effect whilst looking for the cause;
Freezes poor Ovid in an ic’d review,
And sneers because his fables are untrue!
In search of Truth the hopeful zealot goes,
But all the sadder tums, the more he knows!
Stay! vandal sophist, whose deep lore would blast
The graceful legends of the story’d past;
Whose tongue in censure flays th’ embellish’d page,
And scolds the comforts of a dreary age:
Would’st strip the foliage from the vital bough
Till all men grow as wisely dull as thou?
Happy the man whose fresh, untainted eye
Discerns a Pantheon in…

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