A Brief History of Chocolate

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Source: A Brief History of Chocolate

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Teaser Tuesdays – June 30, 2015

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Teaser Tuesdays is a weekly bookish meme hosted by MizB of A Daily Rhythm.

Anyone can participate.

If you’re new to Teaser Tuesdays, the details are at MizB’s A Daily Rhythm or on my Teaser Tuesdays Page.

A series mystery for me this week.

Fever Season
(Benjamin January #2)
by Barbara Hambly

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Men don’t need to be evil, Mademoiselle.
They just have to be bad enough to say,
There’s nothing I can do.

This book is blowing me away! Hambly’s portrayal of New Orleans in the 1830s is breath-taking. It’s like I am there. I can feel the oppressive summer heat. I can also feel the fear of contracting yellow fever which is raging through the town.

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What are you reading now? Do you have a TT to share with us?

Please leave a comment with your link on MizB’s Teaser Tuesday post or below. If you don’t have a blog, you can share your Teaser here in the comment section instead.

Anka Muhlstein on Food, Balzac and Flaubert

BalzacsOmeletteSentimentalEduWhen he is invited to dinner at Arnoux’s house, Frédéric, the hero of A Sentimental Education, “had to choose between ten mustards. He ate daspachio, curry, ginger, blackbirds from Corsica, lasagna from Rome.” Arnoux, a porcelain manufacturer, is not in possession of a great fortune but prides himself on being a good host. He “cultivated all the mail coach drivers to secure foodstuffs, and had connections with cooks in grand houses, who gave him recipes for sauces.” Like many Parisians, he has no hesitation in spending a great deal of money both at home and in restaurants. The tyranny of the palate has never been described; as a necessity of life it escapes the criticism of literature; yet no one imagines how many have been ruined by the table. The luxury of the table is indeed, in a sense, the courtesan’s one competitor in Paris,” says Balzac in Cousin Pons.

Balzac’s Omelette by Anka Muhlstein

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Fans of Balzac, please visit the collaborative blog La Comedie Humaine.